John Wyman, Lieutenant

John Wyman, Lieutenant

Male 1743 - 1823  (80 years)

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  • Name John Wyman 
    Suffix Lieutenant 
    Born 18 Jun 1743  Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    DAR A129095 
    Milit-Beg 19 Apr 1775  Lexington & Concord, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Milit-Beg 17 Jun 1775  Bunker Hill, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 17 Jul 1823  Dummerston, Windham, Vermont, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Dummerston Center Cemetery, Dummerston Center, Windham, Vermont, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I3424  Wyman
    Last Modified 20 Aug 2021 

    Father Jonathan Wyman Click to preview: Jonathan Wyman,   b. 13 Sep 1704, Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aug 1780, Dummerston, Windham, Vermont, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years) 
    Mother Martha Thompson Click to preview: Martha Thompson,   b. 7 Dec 1706, Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Nov 1785, Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years) 
    Married 1734  Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F1105  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Hepzibah Oliver Click to preview: Hepzibah Oliver,   b. 27 Apr 1745,   d. 11 Aug 1821, Dummerston Center, Windham, Vermont, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Married 1 Aug 1765  Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    Children 
     1. John Wyman Click to preview: John Wyman,   b. 23 Jun 1766, Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jun 1842  (Age 76 years)
     2. Hepzibah Wyman Click to preview: Hepzibah Wyman,   b. 2 Aug 1774, Dummerston, Windham, Vermont, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Oct 1859, Dummerston Center, Windham, Vermont, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)
     3. George Washington Wyman Click to preview: George Washington Wyman,   b. 23 Apr 1779, Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 26 Feb 2010 
    Family ID F1576  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 18 Jun 1743 - Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1 Aug 1765 - Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMilit-Beg - 19 Apr 1775 - Lexington & Concord, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMilit-Beg - 17 Jun 1775 - Bunker Hill, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 17 Jul 1823 - Dummerston, Windham, Vermont, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Dummerston Center Cemetery, Dummerston Center, Windham, Vermont, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    johnwyman12.jpg
    johnwyman12.jpg

  • Notes 
    • (following is an excerpt from family tree) compiled from official records & supplemented by entries in family bible by elizabeth willophippenay-wyman of hartford conn. February 17th 1915 John Wyman born Woburn Mass. June 18th 1743 died July 17th 1823 Dummerston vt. John was a member of the 'Boston Tea Party' and one those who dressed in the costume of the Mohawk indians,went aboard the British vessel in Boston harbor in 1773 and 'took the old tea and done as they oughter and tipped it all out right into the water.' he fought at Lexington& Concord april 19th 1775 and at Bunker Hill June 17th 1775, also fought in several other battles and was promoted for meritorious service. he was a lieutenant in Colonel Abner Whitcombs 23rd regiment continental line, and first lieutenant of the Rhode Island continental line during the latter part of the war (11th regiment) he received a pension of $20 a month at the Burlington Vermont agency from April 1818 to March 1823 sur. file 41,289, certificate 1818 he was buried with military honors. see Vermont Historical Magazine pages 125,126. this excerpt is word for word as it appears on this 85 year old typewritten document.

      Taken from The Vermont Historical Gazetteer (Magazine), Vol 5, (1891), by Abby Maria Hemenway. exactly as printed on pages 125-127
      -----Dummerston-----
      -------LIEUT. JOHN WYMAN-------
      (See biographical sketch page 54). In 1772, was a citizen of Boston, when an important measure was adopted by an assembly of its inhabitants to appoint committees of correspondence and inquiry for the purpose of ascertaining the sentiments and confidential opinions of prominent persons living in other parts of the country, on all affairs of mutual interest.During these movements, a plan was devised by the British Parliament to introduce tea into the colonies; but the Americans would not pay the small duty upon it, of only three pence.

      Several cargoes of tea arrived at Boston. The captain of a vessel was despatched to the Govenor to request a passport, but he refused to grant it and a secret plan was formed to destroy the tea. Three different parties, Lieut. John Wymen being one of the men, sallied out, in the costume of Mohawk Indians, precipitately made their way to the wharves, and without noise and without tumult, the tea was taken from the vessels by the conspirators, and speedily emptied into the sea as an offering to the watery god.

      He was in the engagement at Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775, where 3000 British under the command of General Howe were twice repulsed by the Americans; till their ammunition failed, and on the third charge of the British, they were obliged to retire. Having served as a private in the early part of the war, he was soon afterwards promoted Lieutenant, for meritorious conduct in several battles, and was in service with the Rhode Island troops, during the last part of the Revolution.

      When living in this town, during the toublesome times with the "Yorkers", he was very active in maintaining the rights of inhabitants to
      claims of land purchased from the Govenor of Hampshire. The government of New York declared the titles of the land-grants good for nothing, and required the occupants to purchase the lands a second time. Many refused to do this; their lands were sold to other persons; and the holders were sued and ordered to leave. They would not do it; and roughly handled the sheriffs and others, who attempted to force them away. The people at length became so enraged that they would not allow any person who sympathized with the Yorkers to remain at liberty, but arrested all such persons and put them in jail at Westminister. Colonel Church, who lived in the edge of Brattleboro on the West river road was a "Yorker" in political sentiment, and to punish him for entertaining such provocative opinions, the "committee of safety" were determined to "jug him" . Lieut. Wyman and Charles Davenport were the leaders of the party that proceeded to the house of the Colonel for the purpose of taking him prisoner. On their arrival, Wyman knocked loudly for admittance; but no one answered the call, and the door was found to be securely fastened. He shook, pounded and kicked at the door making a tremendous noise, when it opened suddenly and a dish of hot porridge was thrown into his face. This unexpected calamity did not hinder the proceedings, -- the men rushed in and searched the house thoroughly but could find nothing of the Colonel inside the building. Mr. Davenport in the mean time had searched the barn and sheds; but not finding him there; looked around the outside of the house. He soon found a small opening through the underpinning and crawled in to reconnoitre the grounds. It was a difficult passage; but he pushed on through the gloomy labyrinth of cobwebs till at last he spied the Colonel snugly tucked away in the remotest corner. Fearing he might have a gun with him, he ventured no farther, but crawled back, went into the house and, going directly over the place, he jumped violently on the floor, "There!" said he, "the Colonel is right under here." All rushed to the hole, and Davenport again crawled through, and crept cautiously towards him till he was satisfied he had no gun then venturing quite near said, "Come. Colonel Church, come out, come out--come out." He was finally persuaded, and came out. The party immediately started with him towards Westminister. Just as they were going out of sight, the Colonel's boys , who were hid behind the hill, fired a parting shot into the company; but no one was injured, and the Colonel was safely lodge in jail.

      The following is taken from The Vermont Historical Gazeteer (Magazine), Vol. 5, (1891), by Abby Maria Hemenway.

      Dummerston

      The following is typed exactly as it is printed on pages 54-55

      "Capt. John Wyman"

      On a gravestone in the cemetery at Dummerston Centre, is the inscription; "Capt. John Wyman, an officer of the Revolution. Died July 23d, 1823, aged 80 years." Captain Wyman was born in Cambridge, Mass., in 1743. His rank in the Revolutionary army was lieutenant, and his service was in the Rhode Island Continental Line. He was placed on the pension roll Apr. 15, 1818. Annual Allowance $240. Sums received $1276.07. This information the writer obtained from an old pension roll printed about 1835, which also contains the names of all persons who were or had been pensioners belonging to Windham County. When writing for Miss Hemenway's publication ten years ago, we obtained the information that Capt. Wyman was one of the number who dressed in the costume of Mohawk Indians, went on board of the British vessel in Boston harbor in 1773, and:

      "Took the old tea and done as they oughter,
      And tipped it all out right into the water."

      Capt. Wyman's home in this town was where Henry French now lives. He was a tanner by trade, and marks of the old tan-vats are now visible on the flat south of the barn near Salmon brook. His disposition and character were of a belligerant nature. He was all military, and was fond of relating his exploits and deeds in Revolutionary times. Bunker Hill was his favorite theme. He selected the spot on his farm where he wished to be buried and called it Bunker Hill. It was on high land west of the house, back of which extends a beautiful plain. He was buried under military honors, a company of soldiers, or military men, being present on the occasion, from out of town. A liberty pole was erected near his grave. After a few years his remains were removed to the cemetery where they now rest, and over which a marble slab was raised by his relatives, bearing the inscription we have quoted.

      Of the many songs about Capt. Wyman that he or some one else used to sing in his day, the following verse is a sample:
      "Beleive me Sirs, now if you please,
      A ball took of my breeches knees:
      From a loud cannon it was sent,
      As I against the Britons went."

      A little war-like character occurred in this town, in which Capt. Wyman figured prominently. He got into a dispute with a prominent man of the town. Bela Shaw, we believe was his name. From words they came to blows, the Captain got knocked down to the floor by Shaw. The Captain indignant threatened prosecution: what resulted the doggered tells,

      "In Mr Shaw, he picked a flaw.
      Who then to have some fun, Sir,
      The other night did not do right
      And knocked John Wyman down Sir,

      He knocked him down upon the floor, Sir
      Where he did long remain;
      At length he rose with head so sore
      That loud he did complain.

      Bela Shaw, said he, you, me, have hit
      And now for what you've done
      I'll go and get a justice' writ
      As fast as I can run.

      But Shaw was wise and did advise
      With him he'd arbitrate:
      Two mugs of tod, they did award
      As the price of Wyman's pate."

      Capt. Wyman was one of the number who took offence at hearing what they called a " tory sermon preached by Rev. Hosea Beckley during the war of 1812. His text was in Rev. XII, 7. "And there was war in heaven." "England," he said, "loved us, and we declared war against her. France hated us and we loved France." Capt. Wyman would not hear Mr Beckley preach afterward for a long time. On one occasion, when Mr beckley was to exchange with another minister, he called and notified the Captain of the event, and that it would afford him an opportunity to attend meeting in his absence. This act restored him to favor and he again attended Mr Beckley's meeting.

      He was a Lieutenant in Colonel Abner Whitcomb's 23rd Regiment Continental Line and First Lieutenant of the Rhode Island Continental Line during the latter part of the war (11th Regiment)

  • Sources 
    1. [S89] Woburn Vital Records, (Andrews, Cutler & Co., Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, 1890-91), p. 290 (Reliability: 3).

    2. [S797] Massachusetts Marriage Index, (Broderbund).

    3. [S944] Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts Vital Records, Vol II, p. 437 (Reliability: 3).