William B. Weatherby

Male 1813 - 1893  (79 years)


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  • Name William B. Weatherby 
    Born 21 Jul 1813  Manchester, Bennington, Vermont, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Residence 1831  , Shiawassee, Michigan, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _FGLINK https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/17242376 
    _FGRAVE 17242376 
    _FSFTID MWZQ-CTX 
    _FSLINK https://www.familysearch.org/tree/person/details/MWZQ-CTX 
    _UID 40AB8E6AB31587409A383825AB511F41FD7B 
    Died 15 Mar 1893  Fairfield, Lenawee, Michigan, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Weston Village Cemetery, Weston, Lenawee, Michigan, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I48135  Wyman
    Last Modified 5 Jan 2020 

    Family Sarah C. Carpenter Click to preview: Sarah C. Carpenter,   b. 10 Aug 1818, Shelby Basin, Orleans, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Feb 1903, Fairfield Twp, Lenawee, Michigan, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Married 31 Dec 1835 
    Children 
     1. William W. Wyman Click to preview: William W. Wyman,   b. 1 Feb 1844, Fairfield Twp, Lenawee, Michigan, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Mar 1880, Fairfield Twp, Lenawee, Michigan, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 36 years)  [Adopted]
    Last Modified 26 Feb 2010 
    Family ID F16698  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 21 Jul 1813 - Manchester, Bennington, Vermont, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1831 - , Shiawassee, Michigan, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 15 Mar 1893 - Fairfield, Lenawee, Michigan, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Weston Village Cemetery, Weston, Lenawee, Michigan, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • (Illustrated history and biographical record of Lenawee County, Mich.
      ... , John I. Knapp, 1903, pages 116-119.) WILLIAM WEATHERBY was born in Manchester, Bennington County, Vermont,
      July 21st, 1813. His father, William Weatherby, was born near
      Boston, Mass., July 22d, 1769, and lived there until about 1823, when he moved to Tioga County, N.Y., where he resided eight years, when he came to Fairfield, Lenawee County, Mich., and died there August 19th, 1835.
      December 8th, 1797, he married Relief Miller, of Marlborough, Mass., by whom he had eight children, William being the youngest of his six sons.
      Mrs. Relief Weatherby was born in Marlborough, Mass., February 20th,
      1775, and died in Farfield, this county, July 18th, 1835. William
      Weatherby, the subject of this sketch, lived with his parents until he was about eighteen years old, when the care of the family fell upon him,
      his father and mother being old and feeble. In 1831 he came to
      Michigan, and located the west one-half of the southeast one-quarter of section 9, in Fairfield, this county, bringing his parents with him.
      That part of the township was then a perfect wilderness. He followed
      marked trees and an Indian trail through the woods to his land, and ws obliged to cut a road about two and a half miles to get his wagon
      through. He and his sister being the housekeepers. This was just
      before the Black Hawk War, and occasionally Indians came along and wanted to stay all night, which caused the "women folks" considerable uneasiness, and the "men folks" were none to serene, as all Indians were
      reguarded wit suspicion. William was warned to appear at Adrian,
      with his gun, ammunition and rations,but he was attacked with ague,
      which excused him, much to the relief o his mother and sister. He
      afterwards added to his first purchase, until he owned 260 acres of land, which he cleared up, improved and built good buildings upon.
      In 1873 his house burned, with nearly all its contents. The
      following year he built a new and better house. In the spring of
      1878 he purchased the south sixty acres of the northwest one-quarter of section 28, in Fairfield, his adopted son and heir, William W. Wyman, occupying the home farm. He was the first man to own sheep in the town of Fairfield, and his wife spun, wove and made into cloth the first wool manufactured in the township, Mr. Weatherby making two trips to Tecumseh
      on foot to get the wool carded and the cloth fulled and colored. His
      flock of sheep was twice distroyed by wolves, with the exception of one old ewe, the pioneer sheep of the county, which both times escaped, and
      afterwards raised five lambs in thirteen months. She was subsequetly
      taken to Bean Creek, in Seneca township, where she was again a pioneer, and repleneshed her kind, and escaped hungry wolves, living to a happy
      old age. One day in December, a few years after he came, some of th
      settlers had brought their hogs to his place, the custom in those days.
      A little before noon a man came along with a gun, saying that he had wounded a deer, over in Ohio, and had followed him into that vincinity, and learning that Mr. Weatherby had a famous dog, after dinner, suggested that all hands turn out with the dog and catch the deer.
      Everybody was ready for the sport, and away they went. There was a
      good "tracking snow" at the time, the deer's tracks being easily followed, and before they had got beyond Mr. Weaterby's land, the deer
      -- a large buck -- was captured. He had secreted himself in a tree
      top, and it so happened that Mr. Weatherby, Benjamin Baker, John Reynolds and the dog came upon the animal and startled him, when Mr.
      Weatherby told his dog to catch him. The dog at once obeyed and
      grabbed him by the left ear. This so enraged the deer that in the
      struggle he threw the dog over his neck, and in this way the deer came down a little revine in the direction of Mr. Weatherby, who jumped behind a small elm tree, which the deer, in his efforts to rid himself
      of the dog, ran against. At that instant Mr. Weatherby seized him by
      his large horns and brought them with all his strength against the opposite side of the tree, holding him there until Benjamin Baker cut
      his throat. The dog kept his hold until strangled by the blood that
      spurted into his mouth. This was considered the best dog in the
      entire settlement. December 31st, 1835, Mr. Weatherby married Sarah
      C. Carpenter, daughter of elder James and Catherine Carpenter, of
      Fairfield. Mrs. Weatherby never had any children, but a sister died,
      leaving an infant, which she brough up, was adopted, and became the legal heir of the Weatherby estate, as follows: William W. Wyman was born in Fairfield, February 1st, 1844, and died March 31st, 1880.
      July 3d, 1865, he married Miss Salina DeLand. By this marriage were
      born as follows: Cora S., born in Fairfield, January 26, 1867, died
      December 2, 1878 ; Delight, born January 6, 1869, died March 1st, 1874 ; Laura A., born March 30, 1871, and was married to George B. Schomp, September 18, 1887, and is now the mother of two cildren ; Blond, born September 25, 1875, married to James B. Green, February 17, 1895, and
      nowthe mother of two children. Mrs. Selina Wyman was born in
      Fairfield, August 13th, 1847, and was the daughter of Joseph and Sally DeLand, who were pioneers in Fairfield. Mrs. Sarah C. Weatherby was born in Shelby, Orleans County, New York, August 10th, 1818, and died from
      injury (the breaking of the femur) February 25th, 1903. William
      Weatherby died March 15th, 1893.